Jeff Davis County, Texas

Jeff Davis County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 2,342. Its county seat is Fort Davis. The county is named for Jefferson Davis, the 23rd United States Secretary of War and President of the Confederate States of America. It is one of the nine counties that comprise the Trans-Pecos region of West Texas. The county contains the Texas Davis Mountains American Viticultural Area, though only about is currently under vine. The McDonald Observatory is located near Fort Davis, and is owned by the University of Texas at Austin.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Guadalupe Mountains National Park is in the Guadalupe Mountains of West Texas and contains Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas at in elevation. Located east of El Paso, it also contains El Capitan, long used as a landmark by people traveling along the old route later followed by the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach line. Visitors can see the ruins of an old stagecoach station near the Pine Springs Visitor Center. Camping is available at the Pine Springs Campground and Dog Canyon. The restored Frijole Ranch House is now a small museum of local ranching history and is the trailhead for Smith Spring. The park covers and is in the same mountain range as Carlsbad Caverns National Park which is located about to the north in New Mexico. Numerous well-established trails exist in the park for hiking and horse-riding. The Guadalupe Peak Trail offers perhaps the most outstanding views in the park. Climbing over to the summit of Guadalupe Peak, the trail winds through pinyon pine and Douglas-fir forests and offers spectacular views of El Capitan and the vast Chihuahuan Desert. The park also contains McKittrick Canyon. During the Fall, McKittrick comes alive with a blaze of color from the turning Bigtooth Maples, in stark contrast with the surrounding Chihuahuan Desert. A trail in the canyon leads to a stone cabin built in the early 1930s, formerly the vacation home of Wallace Pratt, a petroleum geologist who donated the land in order to establish the park. Dog Canyon, on the northern park boundary at the Texas-New Mexico State line is reached by driving through Carlsbad, NM or Dell City, TX. There is a campground which accommodates tent campers, recreational vehicles, and horse trailers. There is a public corral for livestock available by reservation. On the west side of the park near Dell City, TX lie the impressive and beautiful gypsum sand dunes. Another attraction is the Williams Ranch. Inquire about these two features at the visitor center in Pine Springs.

Wichita Falls

Wichita Falls is a city in and the county seat of Wichita County, Texas, United States. Wichita Falls is the principal city of the Wichita Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses all of Archer, Clay and Wichita counties. According to the 2010 census, the city had a population of 104,553 making it the twenty-ninth most populous city in the state of Texas. In addition to Sheppard Air Force Base, Wichita Falls is also home to the Newby-McMahon Building, constructed downtown in 1919 and since known as the “world’s littlest skyscraper”.

Hardeman County

Hardeman County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 4,139. The county seat and largest city is Quanah. The county is named for two brothers, Bailey Hardeman and Thomas Jones Hardeman, early Texas politicians and legislators. Hardeman County was one of 46 prohibition or entirely dry counties in the state of Texas until November 2006, when voters approved referendums to permit the legal sale of alcoholic beverages for on- and off-premises consumption. Republican Drew Springer, Jr., a businessman from Muenster in Cooke County, has since January 2013 represented Hardeman County in the Texas House of Representatives.

Pease River

The Pease River is a river in Texas in the United States; it is a tributary of the Red River that runs in an easterly direction through West Texas . It was discovered and mapped for the first time in 1856 by Jacob de C√≥rdova, who found the river while surveying for the Galveston, Houston and Henderson Railroad Company; it was named after Texas Governor Elisha M. Pease. In December 1860, the Texas Rangers recaptured Cynthia Ann Parker and her daughter from the Comanche Indians at an engagement along the river. The river begins northeast of Paducah in northern Cottle County and runs eastward for to its mouth on the Red River northeast of Vernon. Its course flows through “flood-prone flat terrain with local shallow depressions, surfaced by sandy and clay loams”; part of it forms the county line between Hardeman and Foard counties. The river has three main branches, the North Pease, Middle Pease, and Tongue (or South Pease) rivers; the beginning of the main river is variously given as where all three branches come together, or where only the North and Middle Pease Rivers intersect. Satellite and topographical imagery, however, clearly shows that the Tongue River empties into the Middle Pease before the latter’s meeting with the North Pease.

Llano

Llano County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 19,301. Its county seat is Llano, and the county is named for the Llano River. In 1869, pioneer rancher John Wesley Snyder led a cattle drive from Llano County along the Chisholm Trail to Abilene, Kansas. In the 1870s, a pioneer community known as Baby Head existed in Llano County. According to local legend, a small child was killed by Native Americans, and her remains were left on a hill called Baby Head Mountain. Hence Jodie May McKneely (died January 1, 1884) originated the Baby Head Cemetery. The community no longer exists.

Colorado River

The Colorado River is a river that runs through the U.S. state of Texas. The Colorado River is the 18th longest river in the United States and the longest river with both its source and mouth within Texas; its drainage basin and some of its usually dry tributaries extend into New Mexico. The long river flows generally southeast from Dawson County through Marble Falls, Austin, Bastrop, Smithville, La Grange, Columbus, Wharton, and Bay City before emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at Matagorda Bay.

Arthur Fehr

Arthur Fehr, F.A.I.A. (November 19, 1904 – January 23, 1969) was an American architect who turned in mid-career from his traditional architectural education to the Modern or International style and was one of its first practitioners in Texas.

gray foxes

The gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) is a carnivoran mammal of the family Canidae ranging throughout most of the southern half of North America from southern Canada to the northern part of South America (Venezuela and Colombia). This species and the closely related Channel Island fox (Urocyon littoralis) are the only living members of the genus Urocyon, which is considered to be among the most primitive of the living canids. Though it was once the most common fox in the east, and still is found there, human advancement allowed the red fox to become more dominant. The Pacific States still have the gray fox as a dominant. Its specific epithet cinereoargenteus means ‘ashen silver’.

white-tailed deer

The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer native to the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, and South America as far south as Peru and Bolivia. It has also been introduced to New Zealand, Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Bermuda, Bahamas, Lesser Antilles, and some countries in Europe, such as Finland, the Czech Republic, and Serbia. In the Americas, it is the most widely distributed wild ungulate. In North America, the species is widely distributed east of the Rocky Mountains, but elsewhere, it is mostly replaced by the black-tailed or mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In western North America, it is found in aspen parklands and deciduous river bottomlands within the central and northern Great Plains, and in mixed deciduous riparian corridors, river valley bottomlands, and lower foothills of the northern Rocky Mountain regions from South Dakota and Wyoming to southeastern British Columbia, including the Montana Valley and Foothill grasslands. The conversion of land adjacent to the northern Rockies into agriculture use and partial clear-cutting of coniferous trees (resulting in widespread deciduous vegetation) has been favorable to the white-tailed deer and has pushed its distribution to as far north as Prince George, British Columbia. Populations of deer around the Great Lakes have also expanded their range northwards, due to conversion of land to agricultural uses favoring more deciduous vegetation, and local caribou and moose populations. The westernmost population of the species, known as the Columbian white-tailed deer, once was widespread in the mixed forests along the Willamette and Cowlitz River valleys of western Oregon and southwestern Washington, but today its numbers have been considerably reduced, and it is classified as near-threatened.